Wordless Wednesday: Frederick Nahodil during World War I

Frederick Nahodil (on left) during World War I

Frederick Nahodil (on left) and guys having a light moment during World War I

Family Recipe Friday: Rudy’s Apple Cake

George R. Nahodil's wonderful recipe for apple cake.

George R. Nahodil’s wonderful recipe for apple cake.

This is the first time this recipe is being sharing with the world.  I grew up watching my grandfather make this apple cake and to this day it is the only apple cake I have ever liked.

 

On one visit, he told me that it was time to learn how to bake this treasured cake for future generations of my family to enjoy as I have.  Though he never used a written recipe (like I need to), he did help me write this out during one of his last bakings in the year leading up to his passing.  I’m not sure if it is my inability to cook or bake anything or just my being sentimental but I have yet to attempt to make Rudy’s Apple Cake.

 

As I was reviewing the recipe, I could help but notice that it doesn’t really take that long to make yet it always seemed like an all day production to me…must have been my anticipation and impatience.

Wordless Wednesday: Hanging in the woods 100 years ago?

Frank Nahodil (front right) and two unknown men

Frank Nahodil (front right) and two unknown men

Wordless Wednesday: Halloween or just another day?

Nahodil children

Nahodil children

Genealogy by the States: Summers in Delaware

Swinging by Geneabloggers.com I saw that there is a new blogging prompt created by Hidden Genealogy Nuggets that focuses on a different state each week.  I love this idea as my family lines have scattered throughout the US and searching in other states can be a bit different that searching in your own town.  Not to mention, this will help me focus on a specific topic at least once a week for this year.

I don’t remember exactly when it happened but at some point when I was very young my grandparents purchased a summer home in Delaware.  Heck, they may have bought it before I was born as it seems to me that it was always there.  Being their little angel throughout my childhood, I spent every summer, all summer, with Peggy and Rudy at the shore house that lie in Bay Shore Park on the Indian River Bay.  George Rudolph Nahodil and Alma (who went by Peggy since childhood) Strausser owned the best place in the whole world and it was that place on Possum Road that left magnificent memories with all who entered.

This is the only picture I have of the home in Bay Shore, Delaware; luckily, my pop is in it.

This is the only picture I have of the home in Bay Shore, Delaware; luckily, my pop is in it.

Though it was small, everyone was welcome and room was always made; I am sure we broke occupancy limits many a time.  If there wasn’t room at my grandparents, people would head a few streets over to stay at their daughter Linda’s place.  Even though I had my own room, I secretly enjoyed giving it up so I could sleep on the floor next to my grandparents bed…I swear I never intended to be an obstacle course separating my pop from his bathroom.  My grandparent never pressured me to “camp out” on the enclosed porch on a folding foam sleeper chair and keep their tight path of navigation free and clear.

Breakfast almost always was either a double BLT or scrambled eggs with fried potatoes and toast smothered with orange marmalade or apple butter.  Lunch was some sort of lunchmeat sandwich if we were home or Grottos Pizza if we were at the beach.  Dinner varied each day depending on who was there and where we were but it was always something or somewhere new.  I do remember that we frequently went out to chicken dinner at one of the local fire houses or community centers; for one price you could eat all the chicken, mashed potatoes, corn and coleslaw that you wanted.  Mealtime was very important as this was when everyone came together no matter what they were doing…this was family time.

Being location between Bethany Beach and Rehoboth Beach, we would frequently go to Bethany during the day (they had the best mini-golf) and Rehoboth at night (they had the best games and rides).  There was always something to do; hanging out in the game room of Sandy Cove, crabbing, or exploring the bay shoreline during low tide examining everything the tide left behind…including those prehistoric looking horseshoe crabs.  When the rains came we played cards or school (I loved the Weekly Reader and other exercise books my Pop bought for me).  When the night came…we played cards.  There was always somebody coming by to play cards, often into the wee hours of the morning.  The cards had a permanent home on the counter right behind Rudy’s spot at the kitchen table.

While I knew my grandparents loved me I realized in writing this blog that they did everything for me right down to making my favorite foods every day.  There was never anything I wanted for other than to stay with them in Delaware for another day.  Sadly, the shore was never the same after my Aunt Linda passed away in 1990 and fewer people went each year after that.  Within a couple of months of my Pop’s passing in 2000 the house was sold and the family of the past would no longer come together.  Funny how a person or place could bring so many together.

Wordless Wednesday: The Nahodil brothers 100 years ago

My great grandfather Frederick Nahodil on the right with his brother John and friends (ca. 1913)

My great grandfather Frederick Nahodil on the right with his brother John and friends (ca. 1913)

Surname Saturday: Nahodil

Ah, as soon as I saw this prompt I knew exactly which surname I would discuss.  My maternal grandfather was George Rudulph Nahodil (1923-2000) and it is his line that has resulted in very little information.  Even after more than a decade of searching and reaching out to anyone I can find, I know little more now than at the beginning of this journey and what I have found has left me with more questions than answers.

George was born in 1923 to Frederick and Flossie (Lynn) Nahodil in the coal mining town of Shamokin, PA.  Fred and Flossie had at least nine children of which two died during childhood and one died in Korea at the age of twenty.  1973 was a particularly sad year for this family; in May of this year Fred and Flossie lost another of their children, forty year old Blyler.  In August of 1973 Fred lost his battle with lung disease and just two months later Flossie succumbed to a heart attack.  My great grandparents missed seeing my birth by just a few short months.

Fred was born in 1892 to Rudolf and Rosamond Nahodil.  I would love to be able to tell you Rosamond’s maiden name but every document I have found lists something slightly different; heck, I have eight (yes, 8) variations of her first name so even that I am not 100% certain of.  What I am certain of is that Rosamond left Antwerp aboard the Steamship Switzerland and arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in August of 1892 with four young children in tow.

August 1892 Passenger List for Steamship Switzerland including Rosalie Nahodil and Children

Oral history passed down through the generations tells of Rosamond being Habsburg royalty who was disowned when she fell in love, married, and started a family with a Prussian officer.  That officer was Rudolf Nahodil…or so the family story goes.  After communicating with other cousins, it seems that everyone has been told the same story but none of us have been able to find any evidence to back it up.  In fact, we have found very little on this Nahodil family aside from their passenger lists and their inclusion in four census records.

If you know this name or the story sounds familiar, drop me a line.  I am certain my Nahodil family will appear in future posts so check back so find out more about them and their lives.

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