Surname Saturday: Nahodil

Ah, as soon as I saw this prompt I knew exactly which surname I would discuss.  My maternal grandfather was George Rudulph Nahodil (1923-2000) and it is his line that has resulted in very little information.  Even after more than a decade of searching and reaching out to anyone I can find, I know little more now than at the beginning of this journey and what I have found has left me with more questions than answers.

George was born in 1923 to Frederick and Flossie (Lynn) Nahodil in the coal mining town of Shamokin, PA.  Fred and Flossie had at least nine children of which two died during childhood and one died in Korea at the age of twenty.  1973 was a particularly sad year for this family; in May of this year Fred and Flossie lost another of their children, forty year old Blyler.  In August of 1973 Fred lost his battle with lung disease and just two months later Flossie succumbed to a heart attack.  My great grandparents missed seeing my birth by just a few short months.

Fred was born in 1892 to Rudolf and Rosamond Nahodil.  I would love to be able to tell you Rosamond’s maiden name but every document I have found lists something slightly different; heck, I have eight (yes, 8) variations of her first name so even that I am not 100% certain of.  What I am certain of is that Rosamond left Antwerp aboard the Steamship Switzerland and arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in August of 1892 with four young children in tow.

August 1892 Passenger List for Steamship Switzerland including Rosalie Nahodil and Children

Oral history passed down through the generations tells of Rosamond being Habsburg royalty who was disowned when she fell in love, married, and started a family with a Prussian officer.  That officer was Rudolf Nahodil…or so the family story goes.  After communicating with other cousins, it seems that everyone has been told the same story but none of us have been able to find any evidence to back it up.  In fact, we have found very little on this Nahodil family aside from their passenger lists and their inclusion in four census records.

If you know this name or the story sounds familiar, drop me a line.  I am certain my Nahodil family will appear in future posts so check back so find out more about them and their lives.

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2 Responses

  1. very interesting story, wish i had something to add

    • Thanks Scott. Yea, the Nahodil family has been very difficult to research though 2013 brought a breakthrough in connecting Rudolf with his siblings and father who all came to this country. Once I have a few more records, I’ll post what I have found.

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